a-to-z-letters-rFirst thing, I’m breaking risotto down into what it is; a rice dish cooked to mush in a broth.  Not necessarily mush, but it does have a creamy texture to it.  But, it is a fancy rice dish generally served first unless served with Ossobuco then it is part of the entrée. (Talk about linking together.  ;))

This isn’t made with just any kind of rice.  For one, long grain rice isn’t right.  A short grain, white, rice, such as Arborio, that releases starch quickly and becomes sticky, are the best ones to use when making risottos.  There are several kinds of risotto dishes out there and each one is different from the other.  The ingredients can vary as greatly as any pizza out there.  But, if you make one misstep, you can ruin the whole dish unlike pizza which can take the mistakes to a more delicious height.

This is an interesting dish to enjoy.  My own descriptions don’t come close, but the words rich and flavorful do come to mind.  You don’t want to eat a lot of  this or you won’t be able to enjoy the entrée or even dessert later on.

To best explain the basic preparation, I best quote from my one source, Wikipedia.

There are many different risotto recipes with different ingredients, but they are all based on rice of an appropriate variety cooked in a standard procedure.

The rice is first cooked briefly in a soffritto of onion and butter or olive oil to coat each grain in a film of fat, called tostatura; white or red wine is added and has to be absorbed by the grains. When it has evaporated, the heat is raised to medium high and very hot stock is gradually added in small amounts while stirring gently, almost constantly: stirring loosens the starch molecules from the outside of the rice grains into the surrounding liquid, creating a smooth creamy-textured liquid. At that point it is taken off the heat for the mantecatura when diced cold butter is vigorously stirred in to make the texture as creamy and smooth as possible. It may be removed from the heat a few minutes earlier, and left to cook with its residual heat.

Properly cooked risotto is rich and creamy but still with some resistance or bite: al dente, and with separate grains. The traditional texture is fairly fluid, or all’onda (“wavy, or flowing in waves”). It is served on flat dishes and it should easily spread out but not have excess watery liquid around the perimeter. It must be eaten at once as it continues to cook in its own heat and can become too dry with the grains too soft.

My description of mush is far off, I know, but that is how feels to me.

On to the recipe!

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Ingredients

8 cups chicken broth, low sodium
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 onion, diced, divided
2 garlic cloves, minced, divided
1 pound fresh Portobello and crimini mushrooms, sliced
2 bay leaves
2 tablespoons fresh thyme, chopped
2 tablespoons fresh Italian parsley, chopped
2 tablespoons butter
Salt and pepper
1 tablespoon truffle oil
1-ounce dried porcini mushrooms, wiped of grit
2 cups Arborio rice
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup fresh Parmesan cheese, grated
Fresh Italian parsley, for garnish

Directions

Heat the chicken broth in a medium saucepan and keep warm over low heat.

Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add 1/2 onion and 1 clove garlic, cook, stirring, until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the fresh mushrooms, herbs and butter. Saute for 3 to 5 minutes until lightly browned, season with salt and pepper. Drizzle in truffle oil then add the dried porcini mushrooms which were reconstituted in 1 cup of warm chicken broth. Season again with salt and fresh cracked pepper. Saute 1 minute then remove from heat and set aside.

Coat a saucepan with remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. Saute the remaining 1/2 onion and garlic clove. Add the rice and stir quickly until it is well-coated and opaque, 1 minute. This step cooks the starchy coating and prevents the grains from sticking. Stir in wine and cook until it is nearly all evaporated.

Now, with a ladle, add 1 cup of the warm broth and cook, stirring, until the rice has absorbed the liquid. Add the remaining broth, 1 cup at a time. Continue to cook and stir, allowing the rice to absorb each addition of broth before adding more. The risotto should be slightly firm and creamy, not mushy. Transfer the mushrooms to the rice mixture. Stir in Parmesan cheese, cook briefly until melted. Top with a drizzle of truffle oil and chopped parsley before serving.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/mushroom-risotto-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

Check out others on the A to Z Challenge.  http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/p/2012-to-z-challenge-sign-up-list.html

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